TANG ZHONG OR WATER ROUX

tang-zhong-o-water-roux

What is tang zhong or water roux?


The tang zhong or water roux (gelling starch) is an ancient Eastern technique, a small pre-baked composed of pure flours or starches and a liquid part, cooked which guarantees leavened and soft and hydrated sweets.

What can replace the tang zhong / water roux?

It replaces butter and eggs in the preparations and allows a longer shelf life without altering the taste and softness.

What is the difference between water roux and milk roux?

They are two starters made from flour, or pure starches, and a liquid:

  • when water is used as liquid it is called “water roux
  • when the liquid chosen is milk it is called “milk roux”

What is the relationship between flour / starches and liquids in the water roux?

The report flour / liquid is 1: 5 (1 g of flour for every 5 g water / milk) or 1:10 if you use pure starch (type frumina or cornstarch).

How are water roux / tang zhong and milk roux prepared?

To prepare them, mix the two ingredients, flour / starches and chosen liquid, in a saucepan, cook over low heat continuing to stir until the mixture reaches 65 degrees, i.e. when it looks like a gelatinous cream and becomes shiny and stirring you see the bottom of the saucepan.

The mixture is then transferred to a bowl to prevent it from continuing to solidify and immediately cooled by continuing to mix.

When the mixture is at room temperature it should be covered with contact film to prevent it from making the “skin”.

How is water roux / tang zhong stored?

When preparing a quantity greater than that required in the recipe it may be stored in a tightly sealed glass jar in the refrigerator for a few days.

When you use it, make sure it is at room temperature.

How much water roux enter into a dough?

If we have to prepare the water roux should we use 6% of the flour of our recipe to prepare the water roux.

If we have the water roux ready its weight must be about 30% of the flour of our recipe.

My recipe with tang zhong:

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